Fr Conor McDonoughThere is something immensely moving about the feast of Epiphany: bearded old men leave their dusty old books and journey by the light of a star to a site of utter newness, the birth of a child, ‘God with us’. Decay is a feature of our fallen world: civilisations grow decadent, institutions crumble, bodies fail,...

This year will see preparations for the 2018 World Meeting of Families in Dublin intensify. Much focus around the event – so far – has centred on whether or not Pope Francis will attend the gathering. All of the signals are indicating that the Pontiff will indeed be in Dublin in August 2018. No doubt, Irish bishops will discuss it...

Negaholism’ is a term that is increasingly being used to describe the state or condition of being addicted to negative thinking. Counsellors and therapists more-and-more see it as a psychological addiction that has an impact on a person’s overall quality of life.It’s important to distinguish between negaholism and deep-seated...

The 2017 centenary of the apparitions at Fatima will surely be a significant focus for the devotional life of the Catholic Church.The story of the three Portuguese child visionaries is a poignant and compelling one.  Lucia Santos – one of seven children – was just seven years old when her mother gave her the job of pasturing the...

Each year is marked by three important religious festivals, Christmas, Easter, and St Patrick’s Day, which recalls the coming of Christianity to Ireland at the dawn of recorded Irish history. Each of them is an occasion for families to come together or to contact each other. Christmas especially is a time to remember those outside the...

Daniel Berrigan, the American priest and poet who died in April this year, once wrote a wonderful little book entitled Ten Commandments for the Long Haul. It was intended as spiritual sustenance, sustaining food, for those who walk the lonely, long road of faith and often find themselves discouraged and running out of gas. Berrigan doesn...

Fr Martin HenryThe opening chapter of St Luke’s Gospel mentions the Visitation of Mary to her cousin Elisabeth, and the birth of Jesus is recorded in the following chapter. Both events are commemorated in the Joyful Mysteries of the Rosary. Why, one may wonder, are they referred to as ‘mysteries’ rather than, say, facts or truths...

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